Concatenate text files with TXTcollector

runs on Windows
screenshot of TXTcollector

Got a stack of text files in a directory somewhere? Whether it's little notes you've left yourself, or a bunch of EULA's and ReadMe's, you've got kind of a mess on your hands. Yes, you can access each file individually, but just trying to figure out what is in each file isn't easy. And if each of them is named a variation on ReadMe.txt, then it's game over.

TXTcollector is a tool that lets you concatenate a directory-full of text files into one great big file. While maybe that doesn't sound too exciting at first, once you've got them all crammed together, you can open them in your text editor or word processor and search that file. Now it doesn't matter if what you're looking for is in ReadMe-1.txt or ReadMe-999.txt, you're going to find it in the new-and-improved mega-textfile.

You don't lose the information about which text comes from where, since in the converted file there is a delimiter string that gets stuck between files; optionally you can include the filename of the original files at this point as well. Choose to grab the files out of a single directory, or tell this tool to recurse through subdirectories as well, and pretty soon you're on the way to taming that text file mess.

TXTcollector is a free Windows application. Expect it to run on any Win32 system, from lowly Windows 95 on up to the latest release.

Download TXTcollector

3 Responses to “Concatenate text files with TXTcollector”

  1. You've got to be kidding says:

    Anyone who knows enough about Windows to know what a text file is should be able to write the following 2-line batch file necessary to accomplish this:

    :loop
    if “%1” == “” append “%1” outfile.txt & shift & goto loop

  2. You've got to be kidding says:

    Ok, so it *should* have read:

    :loop
    if not “%1” == “” append “%1” outfile.txt & shift & goto loop

  3. Jack says:

    Does it mean you don’t know too much about windows if it’s wrong the first time?